Mongolia - Submissions

Introduction

A very short and very specific history of Mongolia's militairy achievements: On Februari 10, 1258, the Mongol khan Hülegü sacked Baghdad and flooded the surrounding country side by destroying the dikes along the Tigris. After that, they went on a rampage, burning parts of the city and killing its inhabitants (as was appereantly their custom, but in those days everybody did that sort of stuff). In September 1260 the party was over and an Islamic, Turkish army put a stop to the Mongol advance. The war between the Turks and the Mongols came alive again when their armies clashes just outside of Ankara (at that time not a capital city; just a small, normal city) on July 28, 1402. The Mongols, led by Tamburlaine (not to be confused with Timbaland), were victorious, but again, two years later they had to retreat eastward again to face China. But if you want to know more about this China part, you should watch Milan. Fun fact: around 1263, a Turk characterised the Mongols as "uninhibitedly cruel" and "habitually drunk", [1].

Having seen Charley Boorman and this other guy drive through it, and having been to Russia a few times myself, it just appears to be a place you get bored of relatively fast (at least, when you have no bussiness there or when you don't know any people). But anyway, it looks great.

Just for fun a picture of somewhere in Mongolia; a gift from Hanne on 26 May 2014.

They keep on coming. This time on 29 May 2014.

Another one on 14 December 2013.

Ulaanbaatar - Улаанбатаар

Roundabout in UlaanBaatar, Mongolia on the Peace avenue. Since there are no streetnames on my map I will give the coordinates: 47.915595, 106.974041. Picture taken by Winfried on 8 May 2014.

The statue is dedicated to the Mongolian People's Squadron. During the 2nd World War (or the Great Patriotic War as it is known over there), the Mongolian peaple seem to have donated goods, aircraft, tanks and other war machinery to the Soviets whom were fighting the Germans on our Eastern front. After that they also seem to have send pilots. More on this can be found here: http://www.hicheel.mn.

Literature

  1. A. Pagden; "Worlds at war"; 2009.

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